Emerging America Blog: A voice for quality history education

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS TPS-CES – EVENTS

DEADLINE APPROACHES: UMass Amherst – CES History Institute – Register by Dec. 15
Earn 10 PDPs & $50 gift card for attending any two Feinberg Lectures plus two sessions at CES in Northampton, January 22 and February 26 – 4:30-7:00pm.
NEW – Additional sessions:

  • Tues., Dec. 9, 4:00pm – Center for the Yiddish Book: “So how do you like America?”: Discussion for teachers – Josh Lambert, visiting professor of English at UMass Amherst. MUST PRE-REGISTER.
  • The gender and immigration conference in January is Thursday, Feb. 26 and Friday, Feb. 27, NOT Friday and Saturday.
  • There is a scheduled Feinberg Lecture April 6.

  • NEW FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

  • Frederick Douglass.
  • 1912 Lawrence “Bread and Roses Strike”
  • December in History at the Library of Congress: Wright Brothers, death of Washington.

  • TOP RESOURCES FROM THE NCSS CONFERENCE – BOSTON

  • NCSS – College, Career, & Citizenship Framework (C3) www.socialstudies.org/c3 This is the future of the Social Studies. Download it. Learn it.
  • AMAZING booklet of exemplary curriculum based on C3 from 15 leading social studies orgs. “Teaching the C3 Framework: Exploring Inquiry-Based Instruction in the Social Studies.” (I think a benefit of membership, but making sure.)
  • Periodic Table of the Presidents – Geek cool!
  • Teaching Tolerance – Effective and balanced FREE curriculum to end racism, sexism, classism, homophobia.
  • Massachusetts Geographic Alliance – Workshops and resources.
  • eBook versions of Library of Congress Primary Source Sets


  • From Dr. David Pook:

  • Tools for Teachers: Close Reading & Text-Dependent Questions” (Aspen Institute)
  • Understanding the CCSS: What They Are and How They Work: Choosing, Teaching, and Assessing Complex Texts”

  • OTHER RECOMMENDED RESOURCES & EVENTS

    Free 30-hour course, Sundays, Jan. 18-Mar. 29. – National Consortium for Teaching about Asia. Tabor Academy History Department. Marion, MA. Five College Center for East Asian Studies.

    Student documentary video competition by C-SPAN. Cash awards up to $5,000. Due Jan. 20.

    Free “Get Started with Service-Learning” 2-day workshops sponsored by Mass ESE.
    Thursday, January 29th and Friday, January 30th (8:30-3:30 both days). Doubletree, Leominster Register Here (register by January 22nd)
    OR
    Wednesday, February 25th and Thursday, February 26th (8:30-3:30 both days). Tower Hill Botanic Gardens, Boylston. Register Here (by February 18th)

    NEWS

    Still Seeking Examples of DDMs
    CES hopes to see example of District Determined Measures (DDMs) for Social Studies.
    Email YOUR examples to rcairn@collaborative.org.

    @EmergingAmerica – Follow Emerging America Tweets when I go to the National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Boston – Nov. 21-23.

    LIBRARY OF CONGRESS TPS-CES – EVENTS

    UMass Amherst – CES History InstituteRegister by Dec. 15
    K-12 Teachers can earn 10 PDPs and $50 gift card for attending any two Feinberg Lectures plus two sessions at CES in Northampton, January 22 and February 26 – 4:30-7:00pm.
    Additional sessions to be scheduled!:
    We are asking permission to add the following to the series:
    Tues., Dec. 9, 4:00pm – Center for the Yiddish Book: “So how do you like America?”: How a Generation of Immigrants Transformed the Nation’s Culture. Discussion for middle & high school teachers – Josh Lambert, academic director at the Center, and visiting professor of English at UMass Amherst. Pre-registration required.
    And/or document that you watched videos on the UMass Amherst History Department YouTube channel.)
    The gender and immigration conference in January is Thursday, Feb. 26 and Friday, Feb. 27, NOT Friday and Saturday.
    There is a scheduled Feinberg Lecture April 6.

    How to Apply for National Endowment for the Humanities and other Top Level PD NationallyRegister for free session to learn about these amazing opportunities in the U.S. and overseas. TAKE AWAY: Notes of a draft of application. Dec. 3 – 4:00-5:00pm at CES in Northampton. NEH, Library of Congress, and other free national professional development programs.

    NEW FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

    WWI Remembered – “Experiencing War”
    Meeting Magna Carta: Primary Sources about a[n] Historic Charter. See Library of Congress Magazine online on the topic.
    Native American History Month Resources

    OTHER RECOMMENDED RESOURCES & EVENTS

    Teaching Tolerance Video Kits – One of the best sets of materials for Social Studies – FREE!
    Explore racism, classism, sexism, bullying, and other challenging issues using documents and documentaries from this high integrity antiracism organization (i.e. Southern Poverty Law Center).

    Teaching about the Phoenicians
    A school district asked if I knew of good resources to teach about the Phoenicians. (Mass Frameworks 6th Grade.)
    What do YOU recommend?
    Jessica Johnson, UMass Dept. of History suggested the following. What do you think of these resources?
    Resources For History Teachers:
    Standard 7.17: https://resourcesforhistoryteachers.wikispaces.com/7.17
    Standard 7.18: https://resourcesforhistoryteachers.wikispaces.com/7.18
    Standard 7.44: https://resourcesforhistoryteachers.wikispaces.com/7.44

    HISTORY eNEWS Vol. 1, Issue 13 for NOVEMBER 14, 2014

    NEWS

    Seeking Examples of DDMs
    CES and a team of teachers is drafting state exemplar District Determined Measures (DDMs) for Geography-7th Grade. We will also develop a packet of exemplar DDMs for U.S. and World History–and possibly other subjects. Please help us by emailing YOUR examples in any subject of the Social Studies to rcairn@collaborative.org. (Indicate if I may share what you send.) Examples do not have to be perfect! We will learn from the variety. – Thanks!!

    Challenging yet practical blog post: Is it ever OK to tamper with the past? Altering primary sources to make them accessible. – Ken Wiebe

    History eNews now appears in the EmergingAmerica.org blog which gives a searchable archive.

    LIBRARY OF CONGRESS TPS-CES – EVENTS

    UMass Amherst – CES History InstituteFeinberg Lecture Series
    • Lecture: “The New Asylum Seekers,” Professor María Cristina García (Howard A. Newman Professor of American Studies, Cornell University), Friday, November 14, 1pm, UMass Campus Center, Room 804.
    Register for PDPs
    K-12 Teachers can earn 10 PDPs and $50 gift card for attending any two Feinberg lectures plus two sessions at CES in Northampton, January 22 and February 26 – 4:30-7:00pm.
    NOTE: It is still not too late to register. To make up sessions, you will be able to document that you watched videos on the UMass Amherst History Department YouTube channel. Link to them through Feinberg Lectures webpage.

    How to apply for NEH Institutes – Register for free session to learn how to apply for amazing, free professional development programs across the U.S. and overseas. Dec. 3 – 4:00-5:00pm at CES in Northampton. NEH, Library of Congress, and other free national professional development programs.

    NEW FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

    New TPS Journal available at: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/tps/journal/teaching_with_fine_arts/.
    Issue theme – teaching with fine and performing arts related primary sources from the Library’s collection, across the curriculum. Feature article by Erin Elman and Sheila Watts from TPS at the University of the Arts. Elementary and secondary learning activities, links to articles and reports on art in instruction, and a Teacher Spotlight featuring fifth grade Pennsylvania teacher, Audrey Blust.

    Webinar – Tuesday, Nov. 18 – 4:00pm EST – Using Library of Congress Primary Sources to Engage Students in Inquiry Learning.

    Webinar – Univ. of Central Florida – Thursday, November 20 – 7:00-8:00pm EST – Using Emerging Technology to Enhance Engagement with Primary & Secondary Sources & Considering Multiple Perspectives & Historic Causation, Part 1.

    Library of Congress Teacher Blog:
    Meeting Magna Carta: Primary Sources about a[n] Historic Charter
    Native American Legal Struggles in Primary Sources

    OTHER RECOMMENDED RESOURCES & EVENTS

    Leventhal Map Center – Boston Public Library
    Nov. 15, 10:00am-12:00noon – Open House – Back to School: Geography in the Classroom

    Mass Historical Society Calendar
    Nov. 16 – 3:00-5:00pm – Film & Talk: The Better Angels – John Stauffer – Kendall Square Cinema, located at 355 Binney Street in Cambridge, Mass
    Nov. 17 – 6:00pm – Talk: Decoding Roger Williams: The Lost Essay of Rhode Island’s Founding Father – Linford D. Fisher, Brown Univ & J. Stanley Lemons, Rhode Island College – Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston – $10

    Bill of Rights Institute
    Jan. 27, 2015 – 8:00am to 3:00pm – Preserving the Bill of Rights – Free workshop – Register

    **********************************
    EmergingAmerica.org eNews
    Weekly (Tuesdays) news and announcement of upcoming events.
    Reply to rcairn@collaborative.org if you wish to be removed from this list.
    Register for CES events.

    New Feature: Model Lesson Plans

    June 15, 2014 by | Comments Off

    Starting with this model lesson for Kindergarten, EmergingAmerica.org launches a new feature. Periodically, we will post exemplary inquiry-based lessons using primary sources from the Library of Congress. Contact us with feedback or your own drafts or suggestions for lesson ideas.”
    Rich Cairn, Director, Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program of the Collaborative for Educational Services

    What Do Trains Do? Kindergarten Lesson Plan

    Kwame Webster, Collaborative for Educational Services

    Demonstrations and Approaches

    LibraryofCongress_Locomotive

    Core academic subjects beyond reading and math often get pushed to the edges of the curriculum in the primary grades. Social studies and science can raise challenges because students typically lack contextual knowledge. Yet these subjects appeal strongly to some students. And even Kindergarten is not too early to begin scaffolding skills. The inquiry-based lesson, created by Jenn Murphy, New Hingham Regional Elementary School in Hampshire Regional School District: “What Do Trains Do?” equips teachers with tools to teach Kindergarteners to inquire about concepts of place and time, using often familiar imagery of trains and railroad tracks, and tying them to history, geography, and to their communities. In the lesson, maps of train tracks serve as a means to introduce the concept that primary source evidence can help us learn about our world and its past.

    The robust collection of United State Railroad Maps from the Library of Congress spans 72 years from 1828 – 1900, allowing teachers to introduce aspects of time and history in the lesson. Most maps are quite detailed, allowing teachers to zoom in to students’ hometowns for recognition of place. Students learn to ask questions such as: Who made this map? What for? Why do we need trains? What do these maps tell us about trains? What do train tracks tell us about trains? The framework of the lesson connects Kindergarteners to higher levels of inquiry.

    Using selections from the large body of engaging children’s books about trains, the lesson provides students with background information that feeds inquiry and content creation. A combination of fiction and nonfiction texts allow teachers to help students to ask and answer questions about trains based on the stories. A visual organizer helps students to answer questions about trains and railroad tracks function, location, and description (era; steam or electric powered). From that foundation, students then begin to construct maps to feature the railroad tracks in their community. Students will know where to add railroad tracks on their maps by asking: What do maps show and what don’t they show? What information should be included on maps?

    This lesson provides a distinctive way to teach Social Studies standards to Kindergarteners that supports Common Core emphasis on primary sources and other informational texts. It also allows students to connect with their communities to engender personal scholarship.

    The 2014 History Institute, which is a collaboration between the UMass Department of History and the Collaborative for Educational Services in Northampton. The History Institute brings scholars to K-12 teachers to discuss the historical significance of current events. The lectures are free and open to the public.

    David Glassberg, “Learning from American Environmental History”
    Thursday, May 8, 2014
    Public Lecture: 4:30-5:30PM; Teacher Workshop: 6-7:00PM
    Collaborative for Educational Services, 97 Hawley St, Northampton, MA

    Listen to the Public Service Announcement:

    Watch a video of the presentation:

    Appy and Glassberg’s lectures were preceded by events earlier in the year by History Department faculty Mary Wilson and Audrey Altstadt. The videos of these lectures are available online.

    More information:
    http://www.umass.edu/history/research/history_institute.html
    http://www.collaborative.org/events-and-courses/history-institutes

    Link to Press Release.

    The 2014 History Institute, which is a collaboration between the UMass Department of History and the Collaborative for Educational Services in Northampton. The History Institute brings scholars to K-12 teachers to discuss the historical significance of current events. The lectures are free and open to the public.

    Professor Chris Appy, “Who We Are: The Vietnam War and the End of ‘American Exceptionalism’”
    Thursday, March 27, 2014
    Public Lecture: 4:30-5:30PM; Teacher Workshop: 6-7:00PM
    Collaborative for Educational Services, 97 Hawley St, Northampton, MA

    Listen to the Public Service Announcement:

    Watch a video of the presentation:

    Appy and Glassberg’s lectures were preceded by events earlier in the year by History Department faculty Mary Wilson and Audrey Altstadt. The videos of these lectures are available online.

    More information:
    http://www.umass.edu/history/research/history_institute.html
    http://www.collaborative.org/events-and-courses/history-institutes

    Link to Press Release.

    Download the Press Release .pdf on the Spring 2014 History Institute:

    • Chris Appy speaks on Who We Are: The Vietnam War and the End of American Exceptionalism
    • David Glassberg speaks on Learning from American Environmental History

    UMass Professors and K-12 Teachers Collaborate to Connect Past and Present, Bringing Contemporary Events into Local Classrooms

    Most people assume that history is over. After all, it’s the past. Not so, says the UMass Amherst History Department and the Northampton-based non-profit, Collaborative for Educational Services. Together, these organizations are hosting a year-long “History Institute” for local K-12 teachers organized around understanding and teaching about contemporary events in historical context. The events have covered topics including the conflict in Syria, climate change, U.S. foreign policy, and the conflict between human rights and energy policies.

    On March 27, UMass History Professor Chris Appy will explore American exceptionalism, the idea that the U.S. is unrivaled not only in its resources, wealth, and military might, but in its values and institutions, its rights and opportunities. It is the idea that unlike other powerful nations, the U.S. is always a force for good in the world. Professor Appy’s talk will explore how the Vietnam War posed fundamental challenges to the faith in American exceptionalism, a core tenant of American identity since the 17th century. He will also explore the post-Vietnam efforts to revive it.

    Chris Appy brings a depth of insight and passion to the study of the American War in Vietnam and post-World War II America that fully engages teachers and the public alike. He brings a fresh and textured approach to a much-discussed topic,” says Rich Cairn, Director of the Emerging America Program at the Collaborative.

    On May 8, UMass History Professor David Glassberg will explore themes in American environmental history. Glassberg will show how studying environmental history offers middle and high school students insights into the ways that past generations of Americans imagined and shaped the land, as well as helps students to understand the roots of the current environmental crises that they are inheriting. Glassberg is a nationally prominent public historian with decades of experience with environmental issues, both as a historian and as a politically active member of the Pioneer Valley community.

    Teachers appreciate Glassberg’s grounding in global and local thought and issues. He applies a distinctive twist to history that helps his listeners to make sense of confusing and contradictory ideas,” adds Cairn.

    Following both talks, teachers, scholars and teacher-educators from the Collaborative will work together to develop strategies for applying the content to the classroom.

    This series crosses the divide between K-12 teachers and university historians.

    “Teachers and faculty have each commented on the excitement generated by bringing both groups together. Teachers have said how inspiring it has been to have access to expert scholars and engaging primary sources, while faculty have expressed their pleasure at seeing the history that they work with every day being brought into K-12 classrooms for students in such meaningful ways,” explains Suzanne Judson-Whitehouse, Assistant Director of the Emerging America Program.

    The UMass History Department has hosted different forms of “The History Institute” for two decades.

    This Institute is only the tip of the iceberg, most, if not all, of our faculty conduct public scholarship, from museum exhibits to oral history projects to articles written for public audiences, and they have been doing so for decades. We are one of very few history departments in the nation with an office dedicated to outreach and community engagement, and our Public History Program is top notch.” says History Department Outreach Director Dr. Jessica Johnson.

    The theme of this year’s History Institute emerged from the Department’s popular new blog, Past@Present, in which faculty and graduate students explore contemporary events in historical perspective. These initiatives build on a growing movement within the historical profession and universities in general in general to conduct scholarship that is relevant to present-day social struggles, bringing humanities scholarship to bear on our nation’s and world’s most pressing problems.

    Schedule of Events:

    Professor Chris Appy, “Who We Are: The Vietnam War and the End of ‘American Exceptionalism’”
    Thursday, March 27, 2014
    Public Lecture: 4:30-5:30PM; Teacher Workshop: 6-7:00PM
    Collaborative for Educational Services, 97 Hawley St, Northampton, MA

    David Glassberg, “Learning from American Environmental History”
    Thursday, May 8, 2014
    Public Lecture: 4:30-5:30PM; Teacher Workshop: 6-7:00PM
    Collaborative for Educational Services, 97 Hawley St, Northampton, MA

    Appy and Glassberg’s lectures were preceded by events earlier in the year by History Department faculty Mary Wilson and Audrey Altstadt. The videos of these lectures are available online.

    More information:
    http://www.umass.edu/history/research/history_institute.html
    http://www.collaborative.org/events-and-courses/history-institutes

    Winning Strategies African-American Union Soldier 1863
    Winning Strategies Boston Massacre 1776

    Exploring Emerging America’s Windows on History Program

    Since 2006, Emerging America’s Windows on History program has mobilized more than 30 research teams of K-12 students with their teachers and in partnership with historical societies, museums, town and college libraries, expert individuals, and other very local resources. Students learn to think historically as they track down primary sources to tell the story of their communities and their place in the world. This is the sixth in our series of close-ups on these sites.

    Cross-Grade Immigration Project in Easthampton
    By Rebecca Rideout

    In a multidisciplinary, multi-school teaching approach, Easthampton teachers Ryan Pickard and Jared Orne combined art history, culinary techniques, arts and craft projects, and oral history to explore the immigration stories of this industrial mill town in their unit entitled Immigration in our Community

    Ms. Pickard’s fourth graders and Mr. Orne’s tenth grade US History II students started by studying the fundamentals of immigration history: What pushed people to leave their country? What pulled them to America? What did they bring with them? How did they adapt in the new environment? Students created displays, showing what immigrants from different countries valued and brought to America. Then both classes brought their work to a delicious community event: a cultural potluck. Families, including first generation immigrants, brought a wide range of foods native to their homelands. The offerings included French meat pie, shepard’s pie, flan, roasted rabbit, and even Ecuadorian stuffed guinea pig.

    The fourth grade class visited the Smith College Museum of Art, where Smith students and museum staff had designed a personalized tour of their collection that focused on immigration. Students were given time to write about and interpret a specific painting of an immigrant woman.

    The students drafted letters to loved ones in which they imagined the experience of a cross-oceanic voyage. The results brought depth and emotion to their understanding of the struggles faced by early immigrants, as found in this edited excerpt:

    Dear Aunt Ellis,
    I miss you terribly. I wish you had come with us. I feel lonely without you, and cold without your warm hugs.
    I didn’t bring enough money, so they sent me to steerage. It smells like old potatoes down here. Plus, the food is awful!
    Mom and dad told me that it will be worth it when we get to America. I hope so.
    Sincerely,
    Amber, your loving niece

    Ms. Pickard’s fourth graders also expanded their research at Northampton’s Forbes library, where a local historian and reference librarian helped students inspect primary sources. The class studied maps, searched for their family name in town documents, and perused a 1900 census report to discover the types of jobs immigrants and residents might have had. Important questions arose that led to more research, such as “Why did they stop using the railroads?” “What used to be in the Eastworks mill building?” and “Who named all the streets in Easthampton?”

    To further understand the hardships that early immigrants faced, both the fourth and tenth grade classes were asked to pack belongings that they would bring with them for a journey to a new country. Fourth graders created and packed “culture boxes” that they decorated with emblems of their own countries of heritage. This activity encouraged students to interview their parents about their family’s heritage; moreover, students learned about the diverse backgrounds of their classmates’ families, whether they had recently immigrated or had been Easthampton residents for centuries.

    High school students packed a suitcase as if embarking on a voyage – and then traveled to the elementary school, where they shared their chosen objects with their fourth grade buddies. “The assignment was to think about what you would bring if you moved to a new country and could only bring one suitcase, to understand what it must have been like to leave their home and start a new life,” explains teacher Jared Orne. When the two classes got together, the two age groups learned a lot from each other. “The purpose was to compare what is important to a fourth and tenth grader.”

    Mr. Orne’s tenth graders also conducted oral histories with several teenage ELL (English Language Learners) program members. The questions, written by students, helped them understand why families from all over the planet relocate to Easthampton, and how it feels to be a new resident of the United States.

    Overall, two age groups learned about the variety of reasons that immigrants have moved to Easthampton through a variety of non-traditional learning experiences. Teachers advise that although it was challenging to fit a longer unit like this into the school year, students got more out of it than a basic textbook-oriented course and encourage other teachers to work with their school to create similarly engaging programs.

    “I learned that people get to America many ways and for many different reasons, one being to have a better life than they had where they came from.”

    “I thought it was cool to work with the fourth graders. This project helped me learn what it was really like to make the decision to immigrate.”

    Collaborations between the Easthampton High School, Maple Elementary School, Smith College Museum of Art, Forbes Library, and the ELL Program at Easthampton High School made this project possible.