Emerging America Blog: A voice for quality history education

Excelsior Iron Works

Excelsior Iron Works

The Emerging America program at the Educational Collaborative, in collaboration with the Library of Congress and Special Education in Institutional Settings (SEIS), is pleased to announce a new primary source set on Economic Growth between 1800 and 1860 including the Industrial, Market and Transportation Revolutions!

The following primary source set and resources were compiled to illustrate economic growth in both the northern and southern United States between 1800 and 1860. Such areas as industry, the market economy, and transportation, are included in the set. The set represents a unique period of time prior to the mass influx of industrialization during the 1860s and serves as a precursor to additional study of the later Industrial Revolution.

Completing the set are two exhibits featuring the Industrial Revolution, including one produced as a part of the Emerging America program at the Collaborative for Educational Services entitled Steamboat Barnet. The exhibit features an interactive presentation of materials including “classrooms” for student exploration and teacher resources such as background materials, relevant frameworks, and lesson plans. Students can enter into “classrooms” based on topics such as advertising and products, transportation, and the American system. An extensive annotated list of characters from the period is included and could be used as a source for a biography project.

View more details, or download and access the primary source set online

Emerging America brings this primary source set to you thanks to the outstanding primary sources and materials provided free by the Library of Congress.

 

Springfield, Massachusetts in 1850

Springfield, Massachusetts in 1850

The following lesson on the industrial growth of Springfield, Massachusetts during the 19th century was created during the National Endowment for Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop – Forge of Innovation: The Springfield Armory and the Genesis of American Industry, in the summer of 2015.

Utilizing both primary and secondary source materials students will explore the industrial transformation of the Pioneer Valley during the early 19th century. By engaging students with a slideshow of local business logos, students explore the Industrial history of the Springfield area. A secondary source reading and questions, Town to City by Michael Frisch, provides background information on what Springfield looked liked prior to and after industrialization began. Students new found understanding of industrialization in the Pioneer Valley is reinforced by evaluating two primary source maps, one from 1827 and another from 1855, to evaluate the impact on the Springfield area landscapes as a result of industrialization. Ultimately, students are assigned a product and tasked to determine which complementary industries would be needed to support production.  

View more details, or download and access the primary source set online.

Emerging America brings this lesson to you thanks to the outstanding primary sources and materials provided by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Aligned to the Common Core and National History Standards.

Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1632

Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1632

Produced during the National Endowment for Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop – Forge of Innovation: The Springfield Armory and the Genesis of American Industry, in the summer of 2015, the following 4 day lesson plan weaves together both local and medieval history to provide a truly unique learning experience for students. The lesson establishes five main factors leading towards the development of communities: Settlement, Agriculture, Towns, Population Growth, and Industrialization. Each factor is then examined in the context of primary source documentation using the Library of Congress Primary Source Analysis Tool.

Students will enjoy the opportunity to work collectively in groups prior to demonstrating their understanding of an assigned factor to the class as a whole. Knowledge gained from this lesson will provide a valuable base of knowledge for discussion throughout the school year and address transfer goals in economics and sociology.

View more details, or download and access the primary source set online

Emerging America brings this lesson to you thanks to the outstanding primary sources and materials provided by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Aligned to the Common Core and National History Standards.

Bird's Eye View of Holyoke, Massachusetts (1877)

Bird’s Eye View of Holyoke, Massachusetts (1877)

A research unit and project developed during the National Endowment for Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop – Forge of Innovation: The Springfield Armory and the Genesis of American Industry, in the summer of 2015, the following five-day lesson plan and subsequent independent student study, contains a comprehensive companion site to drive student learning and engagement. Instruction and research center around the development of technologies that shaped the American Industrial Revolution during the Antebellum Era in the Connecticut River Valley. Vivid primary source images and a coordinating PowerPoint lecture visually reinforce the industries that developed in cities such as Holyoke and Springfield, Massachusetts.  

The combination of teacher instruction, partner work, and individual student research allows students to interpret and analyze Library of Congress primary source materials in a variety of settings. Common Core literacy standards as expressed through the written portions of the assignment make this unit an excellent interdisciplinary experience for students.

View more details, and download or access the lesson plan online.

Emerging America brings this lesson to you thanks to the outstanding primary sources and materials provided by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Aligned to the Common Core and National History Standards.

HISTORY eNEWS Vol. 3, Issue 12 for April 1, 2016

News

  • April 4-6, Sturbridge – Northeast Regional Conference for the Social Studies – It’s not too late! Check out the excellent program: http://www.masscouncil.org/ Library of Congress TPS workshop April 4 on Multimedia Primary Sources.


FREE – Library of Congress TPS @ the Collaborative

Register for the following:

  • Springfield – April 9, May 9, & June 13America’s Warriors in the Modern Era: World War II to Iraq. Vietnam scholar Chris Appy. Build lessons. Free history grad credit.

Speak to veterans.

Register here or as noted.  † = 1 Grad credit History.  * = 1 Gen Ed grad credit. Fees to register credit.


RESOURCES @ THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS – http://LoC.Gov/teachers

Library of Congress Teacher Blog

  • Fairy Tales – Recordings and Children’s Books Post.

  • Little Green Men? – Great Moon Hoax Post.


OTHER RECOMMENDED EVENTS and RESOURCES

  • American Antiquarian Society Speaker Series: April 14 @ 7pm, Re-envisioning Black “Book History” by Eric Gardner, Speakers later in spring include T.H. Breen & Nathaniel Philbrick

  • April 6When the Road Came Through, free presentation by Barry Ceitz, 7pm Coolidge Museum

  • April 12, 5:30pm EST – Webinar – Teaching Tolerance Selecting Texts for Diverse Learners.

  • April 14 – Mass Service Day 10am-12pm, Mass State House, RSVP Here

  • April 19, 5:30pm EST – Webinar – Teaching Tolerance Teaching about Extreme Prejudice.

  • April 21 – Poetry as History: The American Sense of Place, reading and talk by Peter Carroll, 11am West Wing Gallery, Karen Sprague Center for Cultural Arts, AIC Springfield

  • April 242pm Line of Forts: 18th Century Defensive Line – Yale’s Michael Coe. Old Deerfield.

  • April 24th2:00pm. Meet Lucy Stone: Unsung Heroine of 19th Century – Abolitionist, feminist. Springfield Armory National Historic Site.

 

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Weekly (more or less) news & events

Reply to rcairn@collaborative.org to be removed from this list.

Register for CES events.

Women working in ordnance plants during WWI. Women took on traditionally male work roles during the war.

Women working in ordnance plants during WWI. Women took on traditionally male work roles during the war.

Produced during the National Endowment for Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop – Forge of Innovation: The Springfield Armory and the Genesis of American Industry, in the summer of 2015, the following lesson plan explores the domestic role of Women during World War I. Through the careful examination of Library of Congress primary source documents and secondary source materials, students will understand the social, economic, and political impact WWI had on women and vice versa.

The Library of Congress Primary Source Analysis Tool is used as the primary means for organizing primary source higher order thoughts and to fuel further class discussion. Ultimately, students will use their findings to produce a thesis and address future Document-Based Questions.

View more details, and download or access the lesson plan online.

Emerging America brings this lesson to you thanks to the outstanding primary sources and materials provided by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

HISTORY eNEWS Vol. 3, Issue 11 for March 24, 2016

News

  • Enchanted Circle Theater is hiring an Assistant to the Director. Job posting.

FREE – Library of Congress TPS @ the Collaborative – Register.

  • Boston – April 2 – First to Fight: American Volunteers against Fascism in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) – Clash of ideologies at start of WWII – Top scholars from Stanford Univ. & Wellesley College explore start of World War II through engaging propaganda posters and letters from the front lines. Work with veteran teacher-leaders. Lesson & resources ready to use!

Register by Friday 03/25! Earn $25 B&N Gift Card.

  • Springfield – April 9, May 9, & June 13America’s Warriors in the Modern Era: World War II to Iraq. Vietnam scholar Chris Appy. Build lessons. Free history grad credit.

Speak to veterans.

Register here or as noted.

† = Grad credit History.  * = General ed grad credit. Fees to register credit.


RESOURCES @ THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS – http://LoC.Gov/teachers


OTHER RECOMMENDED EVENTS and RESOURCES

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EmergingAmerica.org eNews

Weekly (more or less) news & events

Reply to rcairn@collaborative.org to be removed from this list.

Register for CES events.

European nations staked their claims in the continents of Africa and the Americas with little concern for the indigenous populations.

European nations staked their claims in the continents of Africa and the Americas with little concern for the indigenous populations.

Created during the History in Motion program, a collaboration between Emerging America and the Library of Congress, the following primary source set contains materials focused on the effects produced as a result of imperialism on the people of Africa and the Americas.  

Imperialism has been a dominant force of change and conflict throughout human history. Beginning in the 1400s, European imperialism in the Americas and Africa greatly impacted the daily life and culture of the native peoples, shaping the course of history in regards to those continents. In all areas colonized by the Europeans, the belief systems of the European powers controlled social, political, and economic policy. By examining the belief systems of each group (Europeans and natives) and the interactions between them, students are able to see the influence of Europeans in shaping the culture of each region.

Featured within the set are recommended secondary sources, classroom activity ideas, and primary source sets produced by the Library of Congress. Materials are divided into two sections: Africa and the Americas. Primary sources images and film recordings allow for a well rounded glimpse into the effects of imperialism.

Materials contained within the set are paired with classroom activity ideas that enhance student understanding such as creating a “gallery walk” for students. In a gallery walk, students browse through a set of primary sources, create questions, and compare and contrast the sources provided. This student centered approach keeps classes engaged and provides for authentic learning.

View more details, or download and access the primary source set online

Emerging America brings this primary source set to you thanks to the outstanding primary sources and materials provided free by the Library of Congress.

HISTORY eNEWS Vol. 3, Issue 10 for March 18, 2016

News

FREE – Library of Congress TPS @ the Collaborative – Register.

  • Deadline Extended! Earn $25 Barnes & Noble Gift Card. Boston – April 2 – First to Fight: American Volunteers against Fascism in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) – Clash of ideologies at start of WWII – Peter Carroll & Carlos Ramos

This workshop brings top scholars from Stanford and Wellesley to work with teachers regarding this powerful moment in World and U.S. History. Work with inspired & inspiring teacher-leaders. Take away lesson & resources ready to use!

  • † Springfield – April 9, May 9, and June 13 – America’s Warriors in the Modern Era: World War II to Iraq. Vietnam War scholar Chris Appy, U.S. Veterans. Build lessons.

    • The Armory houses the world’s largest collection of U.S. military firearms.

    • The Armory employed 16,000 area men and women on its WWII peak workforce, was a leading area employer, and (with other federal manufacturing facilities) led the way among American manufacturers in integrating immigrants, women and minorities into skilled manufacturing jobs mostly held by WASP males into the 20th Century.

    • The Armory exhibits, library, and archive hold a rich assortments of primary documents (including newspaper articles, photos, posters, payroll records, and other documents and artifacts) that help bring the social and cultural history of different eras to life.

Register here or as noted.  † = Grad credit History.  * = General ed grad credit.

Also:


RESOURCES @ THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS – http://LoC.Gov/teachers

Library of Congress Teacher Blog Posts

Library of Congress Fellowship


OTHER RECOMMENDED EVENTS and RESOURCES

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EmergingAmerica.org eNews

Weekly (more or less) news & events

Reply to rcairn@collaborative.org to be removed from this list.

Register for CES events.

Example of a great mosque (Iraq) with dome and minarets overlaid with gold.

Example of a great mosque (Iraq) with dome and minarets overlaid with gold.

The following primary source set offers a unique compilation of images showcasing the expression of Islamic faith through architecture, literature, and the arts. Students are exposed to a collection of sources depicting both the religion of Islam and the relationship between Islam and the other Abrahamic religious traditions of Judaism and Christianity.

Included in the set is a comprehensive historical background on the origins and basic beliefs of Islam and the artistic and architectural manifestations of those beliefs. Recommended secondary sources and classroom activity ideas provide real world options for utilizing primary source materials including Ninian’s Smart’s 7 dimensions of religion.

Primary source materials contained within the collection depict the rich and varied visual representations of Islam in locations ranging from Algeria to New Jersey to Timbuktu. Pictures of mud mosques in West Africa and geometric patterns found in the clothing of a Nestorian Archbishop from Persia indicate the wide variety of historically significant primary source documents on Islamic art and architecture. Through analyzing and discussing the materials in this primary source set, students will gain a better understanding of Islam and the Muslim people throughout history and across many lands.

View more details, or download and access the primary source set online.

Developed during the 2015 History in Motion program, a collaboration between Emerging America and the Library of Congress.