Translate

English Dutch French German Italian Portuguese Russian Spanish

Search

Reform to Equal Rights - Disability History Curriculum

The Reform to Equal Rights: K-12 Disability History Curriculum includes 250 primary sources in 23 lessons in seven units. Inclusive lessons feature Universal Design for Learning strategies and exemplary assessments. Lesson content facilitates integration into many regular K-12 topics. Skill and language development addresses C-3 History and Social Science frameworks as well as Educating for American Democracy Roadmap themes. Developed with Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources grant with additional support from Mass Humanities. 

Framework for Inclusion: Physical, Pedagogical, and Narrative Accessibility

Published on Mon, 12/11/2023

A Comprehensive Approach to Full Inclusion

Effective implementation for all learners, especially the 7.5 million Special Education students in the United States, requires careful consideration of accessibility. In particular, educators must pay attention to critical accessibility principles:

Disability History Is Essential History - 2023 Report on the Teaching of Disability History

Published on Tue, 09/05/2023

Emerging America 2023 Survey on the Teaching of Disability History

By Rich Cairn, Emerging America

At the end of the 2021-2022 and 2022-2023 school years, Emerging America widely promoted an online survey of teachers to discover how much they teach disability history. Though the response has been small, the results offer intriguing insights.

Developing a K-12 Disability History Curriculum

Published on Tue, 08/01/2023

Reform to Equal Rights is the first ever K-12 Disability History Curriculum. The curriculum supports history and civics teachers in all settings. Lessons can stand on their own. Or teachers can integrate selections from the 200+ primary sources, and/or accessible activities, into what they already teach on topics such as impacts of wars, immigration, social movements, and changing roles of government, from the early 19th century to the 21st. The time has come to incorporate this vital history into how we teach American history. 

Tools for Digital Literacy

Published on Thu, 01/12/2023

Ensure that your digital education projects are fully accessible.

By Rich Cairn

When the Library of Congress launched the national “library service for blind patrons” (NLS) in 1931, it marked a key point in the history of intellectual, professional, and civic life for disabled Americans. The U.S. Government would henceforth take the leading role in ensuring that news, research, literature, and ideas are available nationwide for blind and visually impaired Americans.

Language-aware lesson example: Colonial Daily Life (3rd Grade)

Explore primary sources to learn about daily life in Colonial Massachusetts.

Students will practice with posing questions about primary source documents and then analyzing the resources to learn more about life in Colonial Massachusetts. Students will summarize their learning in the final lesson.

What was everyday life like for people who lived near the ocean in Massachusetts 250 years ago?

What can a newspaper tell us about the lives of men, women, and children in 1767 Massachusetts?

Focus skills include:

Subscribe to Inclusion